• BY HUI XU, YUCI XU, XINCHANG PANG, YANJIE HE, JAEHAN JUNG, HAIPING XIA, ZHIQUN LIN | SCIENCE ADVANCES 27 Mar 2015: e1500025
    1. Hui Xu1,2,
    2. Yuci Xu3,
    3. Xinchang Pang1,
    4. Yanjie He1,
    5. Jaehan Jung1,
    6. Haiping Xia2,* and
    7. Zhiqun Lin1,*
    1. 1School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA.
    2. 2State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China.
    3. 3Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Specialty Polymers, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211, China.
    1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: zhiqun.lin{at}mse.gatech.edu (Z.L.); hpxia{at}xmu.edu.cn (H.X.)

    Organic-inorganic 1D periodic necklace-like nanostructures are fabricated using confined synthesis of inorganic nanocrystals.

    Keywords
    • uniform
    • organic-inorganic shish-kebabs
    • nanonecklace-like nanostructures
    • nanodisks
    • amphiphilic worm-like diblock copolymer
    • nanoreactors
    • simulations
    • self-consistent field theory

    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  • BY MINGXIN LIU, HAINING WANG, HUIYING ZENG, CHAO-JUN LI | SCIENCE ADVANCES 27 Mar 2015: e1500020
    1. Mingxin Liu,
    2. Haining Wang,
    3. Huiying Zeng and
    4. Chao-Jun Li*
    1. Department of Chemistry and FRQNT Centre in Green Chemistry and Catalysis, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0B8, Canada.
    1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: cj.li{at}mcgill.ca

    A universal method for oxidation of aldehyde conducted by using atmospheric oxygen in water.

    Keywords
    • oxygen activation
    • silver catalysis
    • aldehyde oxidation
    • reactions in water
    • aerobic oxidation

    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  • BY YOSEF PRAT, MOR TAUB, YOSSI YOVEL | SCIENCE ADVANCES 27 Mar 2015: e1500019
    1. Yosef Prat,
    2. Mor Taub and
    3. Yossi Yovel*
    1. Department of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.
    1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: yossiyovel{at}hotmail.com

    Isolation and playback experiments demonstrate vocal learning in bats and reveal the learning mechanism by continuous recordings from birth.

    Keywords
    • animal communication
    • vocal learning
    • language evolution
    • acoustic communication
    • bats

    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  • BY PETER O. DUNN, JESSICA K. ARMENTA, LINDA A. WHITTINGHAM | SCIENCE ADVANCES 27 Mar 2015: e1400155
    1. Peter O. Dunn*,
    2. Jessica K. Armenta and
    3. Linda A. Whittingham
    1. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA.
    1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: pdunn{at}uwm.edu
      • Present address: Biology Department, Austin Community College, 5930 Middle Fiskville Road, Austin, TX 78752, USA.

      Sexual selection has acted on sexual differences in bird plumage color, while natural selection has acted on the color of both sexes.

      Keywords
      • comparative analysis
      • dimorphism
      • plumage
      • sexual selection
      • spectrometry

      This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    1. BY NICK M. HADDAD, LARS A. BRUDVIG, JEAN CLOBERT, KENDI F. DAVIES, ANDREW GONZALEZ, ROBERT D. HOLT, THOMAS E. LOVEJOY, JOSEPH O. SEXTON, MIKE P. AUSTIN, CATHY D. COLLINS, WILLIAM M. COOK, ELLEN I. DAMSCHEN, ROBERT M. EWERS, BRYAN L. FOSTER, CLINTON N. JENKINS, ANDREW J. KING, WILLIAM F. LAURANCE, DOUGLAS J. LEVEY, CHRIS R. MARGULES, BRETT A. MELBOURNE, A. O. NICHOLLS, JOHN L. ORROCK, DAN-XIA SONG, JOHN R. TOWNSHEND | SCIENCE ADVANCES 20 Mar 2015: e1500052
      1. Nick M. Haddad1,*,
      2. Lars A. Brudvig2,
      3. Jean Clobert3,
      4. Kendi F. Davies4,
      5. Andrew Gonzalez5,
      6. Robert D. Holt6,
      7. Thomas E. Lovejoy7,
      8. Joseph O. Sexton8,
      9. Mike P. Austin9,
      10. Cathy D. Collins10,
      11. William M. Cook11,
      12. Ellen I. Damschen12,
      13. Robert M. Ewers13,
      14. Bryan L. Foster14,
      15. Clinton N. Jenkins15,
      16. Andrew J. King9,
      17. William F. Laurance16,
      18. Douglas J. Levey17,
      19. Chris R. Margules18,19,
      20. Brett A. Melbourne4,
      21. A. O. Nicholls9,20,
      22. John L. Orrock12,
      23. Dan-Xia Song8 and
      24. John R. Townshend8
      1. 1Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA.
      2. 2Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824–1312, USA.
      3. 3Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale du CNRS a Moulis USR 2936, Moulis, 09200 Saint-Girons, France.
      4. 4Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCB 334, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.
      5. 5Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 1B1, Canada.
      6. 6Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.
      7. 7Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA.
      8. 8Global Land Cover Facility, Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20702, USA.
      9. 9CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia.
      10. 10Department of Biology, Colby College, 5746 Mayflower Hill, Waterville, ME 04901, USA.
      11. 11Department of Biological Sciences, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN 56301, USA.
      12. 12Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
      13. 13Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Buckhurst Road, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK.
      14. 14Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, 2101 Constant Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66047–3759, USA.
      15. 15Instituto de Pesquisas Ecológicas, Rod. Dom Pedro I, km 47, Caixa Postal 47, Nazaré Paulista, São Paulo 12960-000, Brazil.
      16. 16Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science and College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland 4878, Australia.
      17. 17National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22230, USA.
      18. 18Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Science, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns 4878, Australia.
      19. 19Research Center for Climate Change, University of Indonesia, Kota Depok, Java Barat 16424, Indonesia.
      20. 20The Institute for Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Thurgoona Campus, Albury, New South Wales 2640, Australia.
      1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: nick_haddad{at}ncsu.edu

      Urgent need for conservation and restoration measures to improve landscape connectivity.

      This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

    2. BY CHENJIE ZENG, YUXIANG CHEN, KRISTIN KIRSCHBAUM, KANNATASSEN APPAVOO, MATTHEW Y. SFEIR, RONGCHAO JIN | SCIENCE ADVANCES 20 Mar 2015: e1500045
      1. Chenjie Zeng1,
      2. Yuxiang Chen1,
      3. Kristin Kirschbaum2,
      4. Kannatassen Appavoo3,
      5. Matthew Y. Sfeir3 and
      6. Rongchao Jin1,*
      1. 1Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.
      2. 2College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA.
      3. 3Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA.
      1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: rongchao{at}andrew.cmu.edu

      X-ray crystallography unravels molecular self-assembly and structural ordering on the curved surface of the largest gold nanoparticle, consisting of 133 atoms.

      Keywords
      • Structural patterns
      • gold nanoparticle
      • crystal structure
      • shell by shell
      • icosahedron
      • helical stripes
      • swirls
      • non-metallic state
      • chirality

      This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

    3. BY ANDREAS HORNER, FLORIAN ZOCHER, JOHANNES PREINER, NICOLE OLLINGER, CHRISTINE SILIGAN, SERGEY A. AKIMOV, PETER POHL | SCIENCE ADVANCES 20 Mar 2015: e1400083
      1. Andreas Horner1,*,
      2. Florian Zocher1,*,
      3. Johannes Preiner2,*,
      4. Nicole Ollinger1,
      5. Christine Siligan1,
      6. Sergey A. Akimov3,4 and
      7. Peter Pohl1,
      1. 1Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute of Biophysics, Gruberstr. 40, 4020 Linz, Austria.
      2. 2Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Gruberstr. 40, 4020 Linz, Austria.
      3. 3A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky pr., 31/5, 119071 Moscow, Russia.
      4. 4National University of Science and Technology “MISiS,” Leninsky pr., 4, 119049 Moscow, Russia.
      1. Corresponding author. E-mail: peter.pohl{at}jku.at
        • * These authors contributed equally to this work.

        Mobility of single-file water molecules determined by H-bonds.

        Keywords
        • water permeability
        • aquaporins
        • fluorescence correlation spectroscopy
        • high speed atomic force microscopy
        • stopped flow
        • light scattering
        • unstirred layer
        • proteoliposomes, protein reconstitution

        This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

      1. BY MARK E. J. WOOLHOUSE, SAMUEL M. THUMBI, AMY JENNINGS, MARGO CHASE-TOPPING, REBECCA CALLABY, HENRY KIARA, MARINDA C. OOSTHUIZEN, MARY N. MBOLE-KARIUKI, ILANA CONRADIE, IAN G. HANDEL, E. JANE POOLE, EVALYNE NJIIRI, NICOLA E. COLLINS, GEMMA MURRAY, MIIKA TAPIO, OLGA TOSAS AUGUET, WILLIE WEIR, W. IVAN MORRISON, LOESKE E. B. KRUUK, B. MARK DE C. BRONSVOORT, OLIVIER HANOTTE, KOOS COETZER, PHILIP G. TOYE | SCIENCE ADVANCES 20 Mar 2015: e1400026
        1. Mark E. J. Woolhouse1,*,
        2. Samuel M. Thumbi1,2,
        3. Amy Jennings3,4,
        4. Margo Chase-Topping1,
        5. Rebecca Callaby1,5,
        6. Henry Kiara6,
        7. Marinda C. Oosthuizen7,
        8. Mary N. Mbole-Kariuki6,8,
        9. Ilana Conradie7,
        10. Ian G. Handel3,4,
        11. E. Jane Poole6,
        12. Evalyne Njiiri6,
        13. Nicola E. Collins7,
        14. Gemma Murray1,,
        15. Miika Tapio9,
        16. Olga Tosas Auguet1,
        17. Willie Weir10,
        18. W. Ivan Morrison3,4,
        19. Loeske E. B. Kruuk1,11,
        20. B. Mark de C. Bronsvoort3,4,
        21. Olivier Hanotte8,
        22. Koos Coetzer7 and
        23. Philip G. Toye6
        1. 1Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK.
        2. 2Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164–7090, USA.
        3. 3Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, The Roslin Building, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK.
        4. 4The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, The Roslin Building, Easter Bush, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK.
        5. 5The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK.
        6. 6International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
        7. 7Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort 0110, South Africa.
        8. 8School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.
        9. 9Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Green technology, FI-31600 Jokioinen, Finland.
        10. 10Henry Wellcome Building, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, Garscube Campus, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK.
        11. 11Division of Evolution, Ecology and Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200, Australia.
        1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: mark.woolhouse{at}ed.ac.uk
          • Present address: Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK.

          Highly protective effect of co-infections on mortality due to East Coast fever and consequences for disease epidemiology and control.

          Keywords
          • case fatality
          • cattle
          • East Coast fever
          • endemic stability
          • Epidemiology
          • heterologous protection
          • malaria
          • Mathematical model
          • Theileria parva
          • vaccination

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        1. BY FILIPPO CARDANO, FRANCESCO MASSA, HAMMAM QASSIM, EBRAHIM KARIMI, SERGEI SLUSSARENKO, DOMENICO PAPARO, CORRADO DE LISIO, FABIO SCIARRINO, ENRICO SANTAMATO, ROBERT W. BOYD, LORENZO MARRUCCI | SCIENCE ADVANCES 13 Mar 2015: e1500087
          1. Filippo Cardano1,
          2. Francesco Massa1,*,
          3. Hammam Qassim2,
          4. Ebrahim Karimi2,
          5. Sergei Slussarenko1,,
          6. Domenico Paparo3,
          7. Corrado de Lisio1,3,
          8. Fabio Sciarrino4,
          9. Enrico Santamato1,
          10. Robert W. Boyd2 and
          11. Lorenzo Marrucci1,3,
          1. 1Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Napoli 80126, Italy.
          2. 2Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada.
          3. 3CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Napoli 80126, Italy.
          4. 4Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma 00185, Italy.
          1. Corresponding author. E-mail: marrucci{at}na.infn.it; lorenzo.marrucci{at}unina.it
          • * Present address: Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

          • Present address: Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111, Australia.

          A discrete quantum walk occurs in the orbital angular momentum space of light, both for a single photon and for two simultaneous photons.

          Keywords
          • Quantum simulations
          • Quantum walk
          • Orbital angular momentum of light
          • Spin-orbit effects
          • Periodic quantum systems
          • Quantum optics

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        2. BY MONICA NIZZARDO, CHIARA SIMONE, FEDERICA RIZZO, SABRINA SALANI, SARA DAMETTI, PAOLA RINCHETTI, ROBERTO DEL BO, KEVIN FOUST, BRIAN K. KASPAR, NEREO BRESOLIN, GIACOMO P. COMI, STEFANIA CORTI | SCIENCE ADVANCES 13 Mar 2015: e1500078
          1. Monica Nizzardo1,*,
          2. Chiara Simone1,
          3. Federica Rizzo1,
          4. Sabrina Salani1,
          5. Sara Dametti1,
          6. Paola Rinchetti1,
          7. Roberto Del Bo1,
          8. Kevin Foust2,
          9. Brian K. Kaspar2,3,4,
          10. Nereo Bresolin1,
          11. Giacomo P. Comi1 and
          12. Stefania Corti1
          1. 1Dino Ferrari Centre, Neuroscience Section, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation (DEPT), University of Milan, and Neurology Unit, IRCCS Foundation Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, 20122 Milan, Italy.
          2. 2Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
          3. 3The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.
          4. 4Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
          1. *Corresponding author: E-mail: monica.nizzardo1{at}gmail.com

          Preclinical proof-of-principle data demonstrate the high efficacy of IGHMBP2 gene therapy in the SMARD1 mouse model as well as in an in vitro model of the human disease.

          Keywords
          • Spinal Muscular atrophy with Respiratory Distress Type 1
          • gene therapy

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        3. BY PAUL A. STEVENSON, JAN RILLICH | SCIENCE ADVANCES 13 Mar 2015: e1500060
          1. Paul A. Stevenson1,* and
          2. Jan Rillich2
          1. 1Institute for Biology, Leipzig University, Talstraße 33, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
          2. 2Institute for Neurobiology, Free University of Berlin, Koenigin-Luise-Straße 28–30, 14195 Berlin, Germany
          1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: stevenson{at}rz.uni-leipzig.de

          Aversive experiences summated during fighting in crickets activate the NO signaling pathway, which promotes the decision to flee and results in post-conflict depression of aggression.

          Keywords
          • assessment
          • social behavior
          • decision-making
          • agonistic signals
          • neuromodulation
          • loser effect
          • social subjugation
          • submissive behavior
          • susceptible period
          • insects

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        4. BY ZOE T. RICHARDS, CHUAN-CHOU SHEN, JEAN-PAUL A. HOBBS, CHUNG-CHE WU, XIUYANG JIANG, FELICIA BEARDSLEY | SCIENCE ADVANCES 13 Mar 2015: e1400060
          1. Zoe T. Richards1,*,
          2. Chuan-Chou Shen2,*,
          3. Jean-Paul A. Hobbs3,
          4. Chung-Che Wu2,
          5. Xiuyang Jiang2,4 and
          6. Felicia Beardsley5
          1. 1Department of Aquatic Zoology, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, Western Australia 6015, Australia.
          2. 2High-Precision Mass Spectrometry and Environment Change Laboratory (HISPEC), Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan ROC.
          3. 3Department of Environment and Agriculture, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Australia.
          4. 4College of Geography Science, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, China.
          5. 5College of Arts and Sciences, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA 91750, USA.
          1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: zoe.richards{at}museum.wa.gov.au (Z.T.R.); river{at}ntu.edu.tw (C.-C.S.)

          Dating of coral tombs sheds light on ancient trans-oceanic civilization.

          Keywords
          • Chronology
          • Coral
          • coral reefs
          • High-Precision Mass Spectrometry
          • Monumental Tombs
          • Mortuary structures
          • Pacific Ocean Occupation
          • Pyramids
          • U-Th Dating
          • X-ray Diffractometry

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        5. BY SARA SEAGER, WILLIAM BAINS | SCIENCE ADVANCES 06 Mar 2015: e1500047
          1. Sara Seager1,2,* and
          2. William Bains1,3
          1. 1Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
          2. 2Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
          3. 3Rufus Scientific, Herts SG8 6ED, UK.
          1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: seager{at}mit.edu

          Present theory and future opportunities in the search for biosignature gases in exoplanet atmospheres are reviewed.

          Keywords
          • Exoplanets
          • Planetary atmospheres

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

        6. BY DANIELLE A. SALVATORE, KEVAN E. DETTELBACH, JESSE R. HUDKINS, CURTIS P. BERLINGUETTE | SCIENCE ADVANCES 06 Mar 2015: e1400215
          1. Danielle A. Salvatore1,
          2. Kevan E. Dettelbach2,
          3. Jesse R. Hudkins1 and
          4. Curtis P. Berlinguette1,2,*
          1. 1Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 2360 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T1Z3, Canada.
          2. 2Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H1Z1, Canada.
          1. *Corresponding author. E-mail: cberling{at}mail.ubc.ca

          A method for creating electrocatalyst films extends the scope of usable substrates to non-conducting and three-dimensional electrodes.

          Keywords
          • electrocatalysis
          • solar fuels

          This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

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