Research ArticleAPPLIED PHYSICS

On-demand transfer of trapped photons on a chip

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Science Advances  20 May 2016:
Vol. 2, no. 5, e1501690
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501690
  • Fig. 1 Device structure and the scheme.

    (A) Schematic illustration of our system for on-demand transfer of photons in a PC. Two nanocavities that trap photons (cavities A and B) are indirectly coupled by a third control nanocavity (cavity C). (B) Temporal change of the eigenmode frequencies (solid lines) and resonant frequencies of cavities A, B, and C (red, blue, and green dashed lines, respectively) where the frequency of cavity C is modulated. The insets show the energy concentrations of the central eigenmodes of cavities A, B, and C before and after modulation. (C) Microscope image of a fabricated sample in which three nanocavities are formed on a silicon PC slab together with three microheaters. (D) Scanning electron microscopy image and the spatial band structure of the fabricated nanocavity. MH, multiheterostructure; W.G., waveguide.

  • Fig. 2 Measurement of the eigenmode wavelengths.

    (A) Resonant spectra of the system measured while varying the input power to heater B. (B) Fits (solid lines) to the extracted peak positions (red crosses) of the spectra, plotted together with the original resonant wavelengths of cavities A, B, and C (red, blue, and green dashed lines, respectively).

  • Fig. 3 Setup of the time-resolved measurement.

    Schematic illustration of the experimental setup for time-resolved measurements. BS, beam splitter; PH, pinhole; BPF, band-pass filter.

  • Fig. 4 Experimental on-demand transfer of trapped photons.

    (A) Experimental results for the on-demand transfer of trapped photons between cavities A and B (red and blue solid lines, respectively) with irradiation of cavity C by an optical control pulse at three different timings (i, ii, and iii). Cavity A is excited at 0 ps, and the photons are transferred to cavity B at arbitrary timings with the maximum transfer efficiency of 90%. (B) Results of a numerical simulation based on CMT, using the experimental parameters. a.u., arbitrary units.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2/5/e1501690/DC1

    I. Design of the PC nanocavity

    II. Theoretical proposal of a scheme for large-scale applications

    III. Fitting of spectra measured by heating cavity B

    IV. Discussions about the coupling strength and the spectrum measurements on supplying power to heaters A and C

    V. Calculations of transfer efficiency and its correction

    VI. Experimental verification of a system with two cavities

    table S1. Fitted parameters corresponding to experimental peak shifts as a function of heater power.

    table S2. Fitted heating slope (efficiency) of each cavity.

    table S3. Fitted parameters and transfer efficiencies determined from experiments.

    table S4. Values of r obtained from measured spectra.

    fig. S1. Design of the PC waveguide.

    fig. S2. Design of the PC nanocavity.

    fig. S3. Schematic illustration of a photon buffer system.

    fig. S4. Single-bit shift operation.

    fig. S5. Results of a numerical simulation of the 1-bit shift.

    fig. S6. Results of a numerical simulation in which 6-bit units are connected in series.

    fig. S7. Schematic representations of the sample.

    fig. S8. Shifts of the eigenmodes by heaters A and C.

    fig. S9. Measured optical Rabi oscillation.

    fig. S10. Correction of the transfer efficiency.

    fig. S11. Coupling efficiencies and Q factors of the cavities.

    fig. S12. Schematic illustrations of photon transfer with two cavities.

    fig. S13. Spectra measured while varying the detuning by local thermal oxidation.

    fig. S14. Experimental results for photon transfer in the system where two nanocavities are coupled.

    fig. S15. Schematic representation of a model of the two-cavity system.

    References (1820)

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • I. Design of the PC nanocavity
    • II. Theoretical proposal of a scheme for large-scale applications
    • III. Fitting of spectra measured by heating cavity B
    • IV. Discussions about the coupling strength and the spectrum measurements on
      supplying power to heaters A and C
    • V. Calculations of transfer efficiency and its correction
    • VI. Experimental verification of a system with two cavities
    • table S1. Fitted parameters corresponding to experimental peak shifts as a
      function of heater power.
    • table S2. Fitted heating slope (efficiency) of each cavity.
    • table S3. Fitted parameters and transfer efficiencies determined from experiments.
    • table S4. Values of r obtained from measured spectra.
    • fig. S1. Design of the PC waveguide.
    • fig. S2. Design of the PC nanocavity.
    • fig. S3. Schematic illustration of a photon buffer system.
    • fig. S4. Single-bit shift operation.
    • fig. S5. Results of a numerical simulation of the 1-bit shift.
    • fig. S6. Results of a numerical simulation in which 6-bit units are connected in
      series.
    • fig. S7. Schematic representations of the sample.
    • fig. S8. Shifts of the eigenmodes by heaters A and C.
    • fig. S9. Measured optical Rabi oscillation.
    • fig. S10. Correction of the transfer efficiency.
    • fig. S11. Coupling efficiencies and Q factors of the cavities.
    • fig. S12. Schematic illustrations of photon transfer with two cavities.
    • fig. S13. Spectra measured while varying the detuning by local thermal oxidation.
    • fig. S14. Experimental results for photon transfer in the system where two
      nanocavities are coupled.
    • fig. S15. Schematic representation of a model of the two-cavity system.
    • References (18–20)

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