Research ArticleSOCIAL SCIENCES

Women’s connectivity in extreme networks

Science Advances  10 Jun 2016:
Vol. 2, no. 6, e1501742
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501742

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Abstract

A popular stereotype is that women will play more minor roles than men as environments become more dangerous and aggressive. Our analysis of new longitudinal data sets from offline and online operational networks [for example, ISIS (Islamic State)] shows that although men dominate numerically, women emerge with superior network connectivity that can benefit the underlying system’s robustness and survival. Our observations suggest new female-centric approaches that could be used to affect such networks. They also raise questions about how individual contributions in high-pressure systems are evaluated.

Keywords
  • PIRA
  • ISIS
  • women
  • centrality

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

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