Research ArticleGEOLOGY

Biomimetic mineral self-organization from silica-rich spring waters

+ See all authors and affiliations

Science Advances  17 Mar 2017:
Vol. 3, no. 3, e1602285
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1602285

You are currently viewing the abstract.

View Full Text

Abstract

Purely inorganic reactions of silica, metal carbonates, and metal hydroxides can produce self-organized complex structures that mimic the texture of biominerals, the morphology of primitive organisms, and that catalyze prebiotic reactions. To date, these fascinating structures have only been synthesized using model solutions. We report that mineral self-assembly can be also obtained from natural alkaline silica-rich water deriving from serpentinization. Specifically, we demonstrate three main types of mineral self-assembly: (i) nanocrystalline biomorphs of barium carbonate and silica, (ii) mesocrystals and crystal aggregates of calcium carbonate with complex biomimetic textures, and (iii) osmosis-driven metal silicate hydrate membranes that form compartmentalized, hollow structures. Our results suggest that silica-induced mineral self-assembly could have been a common phenomenon in alkaline environments of early Earth and Earth-like planets.

Keywords
  • Silica Biomorphs
  • Chemical Gardens
  • self-organization
  • Calcite
  • witherite
  • nano composites
  • Life detection
  • Prebiotic chemistry
  • Aqua de Ney

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

View Full Text

Related Content

More Like This