Research ArticleGENETICS

Structural variants in genes associated with human Williams-Beuren syndrome underlie stereotypical hypersociability in domestic dogs

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Science Advances  19 Jul 2017:
Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700398
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700398

Article Information

vol. 3 no. 7

Online ISSN: 
History: 
  • Received for publication February 7, 2017
  • Accepted for publication June 15, 2017

Author Information

  1. Bridgett M. vonHoldt1,*,,
  2. Emily Shuldiner1,2,*,
  3. Ilana Janowitz Koch1,
  4. Rebecca Y. Kartzinel1,
  5. Andrew Hogan3,
  6. Lauren Brubaker4,
  7. Shelby Wanser4,
  8. Daniel Stahler5,
  9. Clive D. L. Wynne6,
  10. Elaine A. Ostrander3,
  11. Janet S. Sinsheimer7 and
  12. Monique A. R. Udell4
  1. 1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
  2. 2Translational Genetics and Genomics Unit, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disorders, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
  3. 3Cancer Genetics and Comparative Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
  4. 4Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, OR 97331, USA.
  5. 5Yellowstone Center for Resources, National Park Service, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190, USA.
  6. 6Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
  7. 7Departments of Human Genetics and Biomathematics, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
  1. Corresponding author. vonHoldt{at}princeton.edu
    • * These authors contributed equally to this work.

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