Research ArticleSOCIAL SCIENCES

Explaining opposition to refugee resettlement: The role of NIMBYism and perceived threats

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Science Advances  06 Sep 2017:
Vol. 3, no. 9, e1700812
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700812
  • Fig. 1 Framing effects on support for national and local refugee settlement.

    Estimated effects are based on OLS regression. The dependent variable is support for national or local refugee resettlement, ranging from 0 (“absolutely no refugees”) to 10 (“as many refugees as possible”). The control group (no media frames) serves as the baseline. (Top) All observations. (Bottom) Subgroup treatment effects. Horizontal bars represent 95% confidence intervals.

  • Table 1 Reduced level of support for local refugee resettlement is associated with neither individual-level variables nor location-specific variables.

    Only respondents in the control group in our experiment are included. Cell entries represent OLS coefficients, with SEs in parentheses. The dependent variable is the difference between the level of support for local resettlement and the level of support for national resettlement. The level of support ranges from 0 (“absolutely no refugees”) to 10 (“as many refugees as possible”). The omitted reference group for partisanship is independent.

    Model
    123
    Individual-specific
    variables
      Above median age0.068 (0.098)0.108 (0.104)
      Female0.027 (0.096)0.043 (0.101)
      Bachelor’s degree
    or higher
    0.026 (0.104)0.031 (0.111)
      Non-Hispanic white0.025 (0.117)0.010 (0.125)
      Above median
    income
    0.077 (0.104)0.032 (0.109)
      Employed−0.145 (0.122)−0.105 (0.127)
      Democrat0.099 (0.108)0.088 (0.115)
      Republican0.152 (0.133)0.154 (0.139)
    Location-specific
    variables
      Refugee-dense
    county
    0.053 (0.105)0.082 (0.108)
      Census population0.003 (0.003)0.003 (0.003)
      Population density−0.006 (0.008)−0.005 (0.008)
      Unemployment rate0.015 (0.013)0.015 (0.014)
    Constant−0.432 (0.169)−0.562 (0.141)−0.689 (0.234)
    Number of
    observations
    740709678

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/3/9/e1700812/DC1

    Questions in preliminary survey

    table S1. Support for local and national resettlement.

    table S2. Manipulation checks.

    table S3. Framing effects.

    table S4. Heterogeneous effects of media frames (local resettlement).

    table S5. Heterogeneous effects of media frames (national resettlement).

    table S6. Sample characteristics.

    table S7. Attentive subsample (replication of Table 1).

    fig. S1. Measurement of outcome variables: Asking a question about support for local resettlement first.

    fig. S2. Measurement of outcome variables: Asking a question about support for national resettlement first.

    fig. S3. Attentive subsample (replication of Fig. 1).

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • Questions in preliminary survey
    • table S1. Support for local and national resettlement.
    • table S2. Manipulation checks.
    • table S3. Framing effects.
    • table S4. Heterogeneous effects of media frames (local resettlement).
    • table S5. Heterogeneous effects of media frames (national resettlement).
    • table S6. Sample characteristics.
    • table S7. Attentive subsample (replication of Table 1).
    • fig. S1. Measurement of outcome variables: Asking a question about support for local resettlement first.
    • fig. S2. Measurement of outcome variables: Asking a question about support for national resettlement first.
    • fig. S3. Attentive subsample (replication of Fig. 1).

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