Research ArticleENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Far from home: Distance patterns of global fishing fleets

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Science Advances  01 Aug 2018:
Vol. 4, no. 8, eaar3279
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aar3279
  • Fig. 1 Trends in the distance traveled to fish from 1950 to 2014.

    Mean distance to fishing grounds for the world’s 20 largest industrial fishing countries (by tonnage) grouped by expansion history: (A) rapid and continuous expansion, (B) expansion followed by retrenchment, and (C) limited expansion. Percentage of global catch over the past decade is shown at the top of each panel. Countries not labeled in (C) are Argentina, Chile, Iceland, Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Philippines, and United States.

  • Fig. 2 Trend in mean global industrial catch per 1000 km traveled from 1950 to 2014.

    Gray band indicates ±95% confidence interval of LOWESS smoothed time series.

  • Fig. 3 Trends in total catch and area fished by global industrial fisheries, 1950–2014.

    (A) Global industrial fisheries catch (8), (B) percentage of ice-free ocean area exploited, and (C) industrial catch per unit ocean area. Dashed line indicates year of peak global catch in 1996, with percentage growth/decline since 1996 labeled on each time series.

  • Fig. 4 Spatial mapping of the distribution and intensity of industrial fishing catch.

    Mean industrial fisheries catch in metric tons per square kilometer by catch location during the (A) 1950s and (B) 2000s.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/4/8/eaar3279/DC1

    Fig. S1. Mean distance traveled to fishing grounds by the world’s industrial fisheries.

    Fig. S2. Mean distance traveled to fishing grounds versus harmful subsidies.

    Fig. S3. Schematic of methodology used for great circle distance calculations.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • Fig. S1. Mean distance traveled to fishing grounds by the world’s industrial fisheries.
    • Fig. S2. Mean distance traveled to fishing grounds versus harmful subsidies.
    • Fig. S3. Schematic of methodology used for great circle distance calculations.

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