Research ArticleAPPLIED SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

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Science Advances  23 Nov 2016:
Vol. 2, no. 11, e1601019
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601019
  • Fig. 1 Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    Experimental and actual models of the building block (the extruded cube) and the corresponding reconfigurable acoustic metamaterial deformed into three different configurations: (a) (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, π/2), (b) (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, 0), and (c) (α1, α2, α3) = (π/3, 2π/3, π/3). The red arrows and shaded areas indicate the excited waves, whereas the green arrows and shaded areas highlight the points from which the structure radiates.

  • Fig. 2 Experimental setup.

    Experimental setup without the sound-absorbing foam surrounding the sample.

  • Fig. 3 Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, 0).

    (A) Model of the metamaterial. (B) Top cross-sectional view of the pressure field distribution at f = 3.5 kHz. The cutting plane is shown in (A), and the color indicates the pressure amplitude normalized by the input signal amplitude (P0). (C) Frequency-dependent transmittance for the sample where experimental (red lines), numerical (blue line), and analytical (dashed black lines) results are shown.

  • Fig. 4 Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/3, 2π/3, π/3).

    (A and B) Frequency-dependent transmittances of the sample calculated considering two different detection points. Both experimental (red lines) and numerical (blue lines) results are shown. (C) Model of the metamaterial and top cross-sectional view of the pressure field distribution at f = 2 and 4.8 kHz. The cutting plane is shown in gray (left), and the color map indicates the pressure amplitude normalized by the input signal amplitude P0 (right).

  • Fig. 5 Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, π/2).

    (A and B) Frequency-dependent transmittances of the sample calculated considering two different detection points. Both experimental (red lines) and numerical (blue lines) results are shown. (C) Model of the metamaterial and cross-sectional view of the pressure field distribution at f = 2 and 4.8 kHz. The cutting plane is shown in gray (left), and the color map indicates the pressure amplitude normalized by the input signal amplitude P0 (right).

  • Fig. 6 Reconfigurable acoustic waveguide based on a tessellation of truncated octahedra.

    Models of the building block and the corresponding reconfigurable acoustic metamaterial deformed into three different configurations: (a) θ = π/4, (b) θ = 0, and (c) θ = π/2.

  • Fig. 7 Reconfigurable acoustic waveguide based on a tessellation of hexagonal prisms.

    Models of the building block and the corresponding reconfigurable acoustic metamaterial deformed into four different configurations: (a) (α,γ) = (0,0), (b) (α,γ) = (π/4, − π/4), (c) (α,γ) = (−π/4, − π/4), and (d) (α,γ) = (π/4, π/4).

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2/11/e1601019/DC1

    fig. S1. Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, 0).

    fig. S2. Experimental and actual models of the building block (the extruded cube) for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, 0).

    fig. S3. Building block and central unit of the metamaterial based on extruded truncated octahedra.

    fig. S4. Reconfigurable metamaterial based on a tessellation of truncated octahedra.

    fig. S5. Building block and central unit of the extruded truncated octahedron metamaterial.

    fig. S6. Reconfigurable metamaterial based on hexagonal prisms.

    movie S1. Possible shapes of the extruded cube and the corresponding 4 × 4 × 4 metamaterial.

    movie S2. Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, 0).

    movie S3. Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/3, 2π/3, π/3).

    movie S4. Propagation of sound waves for (α1, α2, α3) = (π/2, π/2, π/2).

    movie S5. Possible shapes of the extruded truncated octahedron and the corresponding 4 × 4 × 4 metamaterial.

    movie S6. Possible shapes of the extruded hexagonal prism building block and the corresponding 4 × 4 × 4 metamaterial.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • fig. S1. Propagation of sound waves for (α123) = ( π/2 , π/2,0) .
    • fig. S2. Experimental and actual models of the building block (the extruded cube) for (α123) = ( π/2 , π/2,0) .
    • fig. S3. Building block and central unit of the metamaterial based on extruded truncated octahedra.
    • fig. S4. Reconfigurable metamaterial based on a tessellation of truncated octahedra.
    • fig. S5. Building block and central unit of the extruded truncated octahedron metamaterial.
    • fig. S6. Reconfigurable metamaterial based on hexagonal prisms.
    • Legends for movies S1 to S6

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    Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

    • movie S1 (.avi format). Possible shapes of the extruded cube and the corresponding 4×4×4 metamaterial.
    • movie S2 (.avi format). Propagation of sound waves for (α123) = ( π/2 , π/2,0) .
    • movie S3 (.avi format). Propagation of sound waves for (α123) = ( π/3, 2π/3, π/3) .
    • movie S4 (.avi format). Propagation of sound waves for (α123) = ( π/2, π/2, π/2 ) .
    • movie S5 (.avi format). Possible shapes of the extruded truncated octahedron and the corresponding 4×4×4 metamaterial.
    • movie S6 (.avi format). Possible shapes of the extruded hexagonal prism building block and the corresponding 4×4×4 metamaterial.

    Files in this Data Supplement:

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