Research ArticleENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Carbon emissions from land-use change and management in China between 1990 and 2010

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Science Advances  02 Nov 2016:
Vol. 2, no. 11, e1601063
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601063
  • Fig. 1 Land-use category conversion in China from 1990 to 2010 (unit: 106 ha).

    The letters A to F represent the land-use categories remaining in farmland, forestland, grassland, water, built-up land, and other land from 1990 to 2010, respectively; and the letter G represents land converted into a different land-use type. The numbers 1 to 6 in each bar chart represent the net area change in farmland, forestland, grassland, water, built-up land, and other land, respectively.

  • Fig. 2 China’s terrestrial system carbon stock change caused by land-use category conversion between 1990 and 2010 (unit: MgC ha−1 per year).

    The numbers 1 to 6 in each bar chart represent different land-cover change paths, namely, cultivation, afforestation, transfer into grassland, water, built-up land, and other land, respectively.

  • Fig. 3 China’s carbon storage change caused by land-use management between 1990 and 2010 (unit: TgC year−1).

    The numbers 1 to 3 in each bar chart represent forestland, farmland, and grassland management, respectively. Because of data limitations, the carbon storage change in Taiwan is excluded.

  • Fig. 4 Comparison of carbon emission from land-use change and management between China and other countries.

    The overall impact of LUCC in China was a net carbon emission of 72.4 Tg year−1 (A), similar to the results of other studies [orange bars in (B) (6, 10, 25)]. LUCC-related emissions from China were almost half the carbon sink in China’s terrestrial system [green bars in (B) (26, 30, 31)]. The mean annual global carbon emissions from LUCC were 1.1 to 1.6 PgC year−1 [yellow bars in (C) (79)]. Accordingly, China accounted for 4.5 to 6.6% of the global carbon emissions from LUCC, smaller than those of Brazil and tropical Asia (13, 14).

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2/11/e1601063/DC1

    Supplementary Materials and Methods

    table S1. Land-use categories.

    table S2. Biomass and SOC change due to land-use category change in China between 1990 and 2010.

    table S3. Repeated calculation for part of forest consumption.

    table S4. SOC impact factors for change in land-use conversion.

    table S5. SOC impact factors for Chinese farmland management.

    table S6. SOC impact factors for Chinese grassland management.

    table S7. Biomass carbon density of Chinese vegetation types.

    table S8. SOC density of Chinese soil types.

    table S9. Parameters for Chinese forest consumption.

    References (5967)

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • Supplementary Materials and Methods
    • table S1. Land-use categories.
    • table S2. Biomass and SOC change due to land-use category change in China between 1990 and 2010.
    • table S3. Repeated calculation for part of forest consumption.
    • table S4. SOC impact factors for change in land-use conversion.
    • table S5. SOC impact factors for Chinese farmland management.
    • table S6. SOC impact factors for Chinese grassland management.
    • table S7. Biomass carbon density of Chinese vegetation types.
    • table S8. SOC density of Chinese soil types.
    • table S9. Parameters for Chinese forest consumption.
    • References (5967)

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