Research ArticleMATERIALS SCIENCE

Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers

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Science Advances  29 Jul 2016:
Vol. 2, no. 7, e1501859
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501859

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2/7/e1501859/DC1

    fig. S1. IR spectra during the TGA as a function of the time (rate was 5°C/min) for pristine 6FDA-HAB polymer and allyl-functionalized 6FDA-HAB polymer.

    fig. S2. FTIR for the allyl-functionalized 6FDA-HAB polymer at different temperatures of thermal treatment.

    fig. S3. FTIR for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-HAB before and after thermal rearrangement.

    fig. S4. 1H NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB.

    fig. S5. 1H NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB-allyl.

    fig. S6. Solid-state 13C NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB-allyl after different thermal treatments.

    fig. S7. Dynamic TGA for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-BisAPAF, BTDA-BisAPAF, and PMDA-BisAPAF.

    fig. S8. CO2 solubility and diffusivity for the polymers studied in this work.

    fig. S9. Robeson’s trade-off for the separation CO2/N2 and O2/N2 gas pairs.

    fig. S10. High feed pressure experiments for 6FDA-HAB-allyl thermally treated at 350°C.

    table S1. Characteristic thermal points for the rearrangement and degradation temperature for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-HAB.

    table S2. Mechanical properties of the polymers under study.

    table S3. Rearrangement properties for all the polymers synthesized in this work.

    table S4. Results for the permeability of different pure gases and selectivity of different pairs of gases at 1 bar feed pressure and 30°C.

    table S5. Physical properties of precursor allyl-functionalized polyimide (6FDA-HAB-allyl)– and allyl-TR-PBO–derived membranes.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • fig. S1. IR spectra during the TGA as a function of the time (rate was 5°C/min) for pristine 6FDA-HAB polymer and allyl-functionalized 6FDA-HAB polymer.
    • fig. S2. FTIR for the allyl-functionalized 6FDA-HAB polymer at different temperatures of thermal treatment.
    • fig. S3. FTIR for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-HAB before and after thermal rearrangement.
    • fig. S4. 1H NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB.
    • fig. S5. 1H NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB-allyl.
    • fig. S6. Solid-state 13C NMR for the polymer 6FDA-HAB-allyl after different thermal treatments.
    • fig. S7. Dynamic TGA for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-BisAPAF, BTDA-BisAPAF, and PMDA-BisAPAF.
    • fig. S8. CO2 solubility and diffusivity for the polymers studied in this work.
    • fig. S9. Robeson’s trade-off for the separation CO2/N2 and O2/N2 gas pairs.
    • fig. S10. High feed pressure experiments for 6FDA-HAB-allyl thermally treated at 350°C.
    • table S1. Characteristic thermal points for the rearrangement and degradation temperature for the pristine and functionalized polymers derived from 6FDA-HAB.
    • table S2. Mechanical properties of the polymers under study.
    • table S3. Rearrangement properties for all the polymers synthesized in this work.
    • table S4. Results for the permeability of different pure gases and selectivity of different pairs of gases at 1 bar feed pressure and 30°C.
    • table S5. Physical properties of precursor allyl-functionalized polyimide (6FDA-HAB-allyl– and allyl-TR-PBO–derived membranes.

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