Research ArticleAPPLIED SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

Eye motion triggered self-powered mechnosensational communication system using triboelectric nanogenerator

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Science Advances  28 Jul 2017:
Vol. 3, no. 7, e1700694
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700694
  • Fig. 1 Structure, and working mechanism of the msTENG.

    (A) Schematic structure of a pair of ordinary glasses mounted with msTENG. Bottom left: Structure of the fixing device for convenient adjustment. Bottom right: Schematic diagram of the msTENG. Inset: An SEM image of FEP nanowires. Scale bar, 5 μm. (B) Photograph of an ordinary glasses mounted with an as-fabricated msTENG. Scale bar, 2 cm. (C and D) Photographs of the simple fixator (C) and the flexible and transparent msTENG (D). Scale bars, 1 cm. (E) Schematics of the operating principle of msTENG. Top: Charge behavior when the eye is at different states during the blinking process. Bottom: Potential simulation by COMSOL to elucidate the working principle.

  • Fig. 2 Characterizing the performance of msTENG.

    (A) Measurement of the force and output voltage under variable deformation degrees from 0.8 to 1.0 mm. In this measurement, silicon rubber was used to simulate the skin. (B) Load voltage (top) and open-circuit voltage (bottom) of the msTENG under different deformation frequency from 0.5 to 3.0 Hz. (C and D) The influence of gap distance (C) and area size (D). (E) Demonstration of eye movement signal acquisition through msTENG versus EOG. (F) Synchronous measurement of voltage signals from msTENG and EOG. Top right: Compressed curve from msTENG. Bottom right: Enlarged curve from EOG.

  • Fig. 3 Application of the msTENG in smart home control for both healthy and disabled people.

    (A) Scheme diagram of an msTENG-involved smart home control system. After simple filtering and amplifying, a blinking signal can be converted into a trigger signal to control the appliances. (B) The circuits for signal conditioning. (C) From top to bottom, the first signal is the original blinking signal from the msTENG, and as follows are the signals after being filtered, amplified, and converted, respectively. (D) Demonstration of the controlling of a table lamp, an electric fan, and a doorbell.

  • Fig. 4 Application of the msTENG in a hands-free typing system.

    (A) Sketch of the msTENG as a way to help people suffering from “locked-in syndrome” to communicate with the world. (B) The msTENG glasses are assembled with wireless transceiver module to make it easier to use. (C) Synchronous acquisition of wired (green) versus wireless (red) signal. (D) Correspondence between signals and letters typed in the demonstration of a hands-free typing system (E) with adjustable threshold, detecting time, and cursor shift interval. (F) Demonstration of the msTENG-based hands-free wireless typing system. The words on the screen are typed with eye blinking.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/3/7/e1700694/DC1

    fig. S1. Transmittance spectra of the msTENG.

    fig. S2. Short-circuit current curve of the msTENG under various working frequencies.

    fig. S3. Durability test of the msTENG during 10,000 working cycles.

    fig. S4. The voltage distribution on the sensor under different displacements by FEM simulation in Fig. 2C.

    fig. S5. Principle of EOG measurement.

    fig. S6. Main circuit diagrams for conditioning signal from TENG.

    fig. S7. Virtual full keyboard with grouping strategy.

    fig. S8. Process flow of the typing system.

    table S1. Query table for eye blink typing.

    table S2. Success rate of the eye blink typing test.

    movie S1. Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling a table lamp.

    movie S2. Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling an electric fan.

    movie S3. Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling a doorbell.

    movie S4. Demonstration of the msTENG-based hands-free wireless typing system.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • fig. S1. Transmittance spectra of the msTENG.
    • fig. S2. Short-circuit current curve of the msTENG under various working frequencies.
    • fig. S3. Durability test of the msTENG during 10,000 working cycles.
    • fig. S4. The voltage distribution on the sensor under different displacements by FEM simulation in Fig. 2C.
    • fig. S5. Principle of EOG measurement.
    • fig. S6. Main circuit diagrams for conditioning signal from TENG.
    • fig. S7. Virtual full keyboard with grouping strategy.
    • fig. S8. Process flow of the typing system.
    • table S1. Query table for eye blink typing.
    • table S2. Success rate of the eye blink typing test.
    • Legends for movies S1 to S4

    Download PDF

    Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

    • movie S1 (.wmv format). Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling a table lamp.
    • movie S2 (.wmv format). Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling an electric fan.
    • movie S3 (.wmv format). Demonstration of the msTENG in controlling a doorbell.
    • movie S4 (.wmv format). Demonstration of the msTENG-based hands-free wireless typing system.

    Files in this Data Supplement:

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