Research ArticleSYNTHETIC BIOLOGY

A surface-display biohybrid approach to light-driven hydrogen production in air

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Science Advances  21 Feb 2018:
Vol. 4, no. 2, eaap9253
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aap9253
  • Fig. 1 Proposed surface-display biohybrid approach to light-driven hydrogen production in air.
  • Fig. 2 Hydrogen photosynthesis by the E. coli cell–CdS hybrid system.

    (A) Detailed diagram of an engineered E. coli cell. (B) TEM images of biosynthesized CdS nanoparticles on the surface of an engineered E. coli cell. (C) EDX confirmation of randomly chosen CdS nanoparticle. (D) H2 production by the hybrid system under anaerobic conditions. (E) Changes in the rate of H2 production by the hybrid system during irradiation. SDs represent the averages of three independent experiments. CFU, colony-forming units.

  • Fig. 3 Light-driven hydrogen production by the encapsulated hybrid system in air.

    (A) SFD in the semiconductor–engineered E. coli hybrid system encapsulated by biomimetic polymers. (B) Microsensor-based measurement of O2 concentration in the various independent encapsulated cell aggregates (n = 3). (C and D) SEM images of encapsulated cell aggregates at different magnification. (E) Measurements of continuous hydrogen production in our biohybrid system. (F) Measurements of the amount of hydrogen produced by the various biohybrid systems under aerobic conditions ([] indicates silicification-induced aggregation). HydA, [NiFe]-hydrogenase HyaABCDEF.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/4/2/eaap9253/DC1

    fig. S1. The amount of biosynthesized CdS nanoparticles on the engineered E. coli cell surface was measured by ICP-MS.

    fig. S2. Characterization of biologically precipitated CdS nanoparticles on the outer membranes of E. coli cells.

    fig. S3. Photon transfer by in situ biosynthesized CdS nanoparticles.

    fig. S4. Quantitative comparison of the photoelectrical capacity of an in situ biosynthesized CdS nanoparticle.

    fig. S5. Image of encapsulated hybrid aggregates.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • fig. S1. The amount of biosynthesized CdS nanoparticles on the engineered E. coli cell surface was measured by ICP-MS.
    • fig. S2. Characterization of biologically precipitated CdS nanoparticles on the outer membranes of E. coli cells.
    • fig. S3. Photon transfer by in situ biosynthesized CdS nanoparticles.
    • fig. S4. Quantitative comparison of the photoelectrical capacity of an in situ biosynthesized CdS nanoparticle.
    • fig. S5. Image of encapsulated hybrid aggregates.

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