Research ArticleAPPLIED ECOLOGY

Global restoration opportunities in tropical rainforest landscapes

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Science Advances  03 Jul 2019:
Vol. 5, no. 7, eaav3223
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav3223
  • Fig. 1 ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes in lowlands.

    (A) Restoration benefits (biodiversity conservation, water security, climate change adaptation, and mitigation combined), (B) restoration feasibility (reduced land opportunity costs, reduced landscape variation in forest restoration success, and higher likelihood of forest persistence combined), and (C) benefits combined with feasibility of restoration. Higher ROS (values ranging from 0 to 1) represent landscapes with higher potential restoration benefits and feasibility. The depiction of boundaries and geographic names is simply for display purposes and does not imply views regarding the legal status of any territory or country.

  • Fig. 2 Top 10 countries, ecoregions, conservation hotspots, and KBAs with the largest area of restoration hotspots.

    Total area of restoration hotspots [bars; million hectare meter (Mha)] and the mean ROS of all restorable areas (dots) within each country, ecoregion, conservation hotspot, and KBA in the study area.

  • Fig. 3 Restoration hotspots, conservation hotspots, and Bonn Challenge commitments.

    Spatial congruence between global hotspots for restoring tropical rainforest landscapes in lowlands and for biodiversity conservation in the global tropics (A), and between restoration hotspots and countries with restoration commitments to the Bonn Challenge (A). Expanded areas within the biodiversity conservation hotspots Atlantic Forest (B), Guinean Forests of West Africa (C), and Indo-Burma (D). The depiction of boundaries and geographic names is simply for display purposes and does not imply views regarding the legal status of any territory or country.

  • Fig. 4 Spatial congruence among benefits and feasibility of restoration.

    Pearson’s correlation coefficients for all combinations of benefits and feasibility of restoring tropical rainforest landscapes in lowlands.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary material for this article is available at http://advances.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/5/7/eaav3223/DC1

    Fig. S1. Distribution of the total restoration area in relation to the ROS in tropical rainforest landscapes.

    Fig. S2. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of countries, with data renormalized for each country.

    Fig. S3. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of biogeographical realms, with data renormalized for each realm (A, Neotropics; B, Afrotropics; C, Indo-Malaysia; D, Australasia).

    Fig. S4. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of global hotspots for biodiversity conservation, with data renormalized for each hotspot.

    Fig. S5. Identification of restorable areas.

    Fig. S6. Restoration benefits.

    Fig. S7. Restoration feasibility factors.

    Table S1. Country’s ROS, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of tropical rainforest landscapes and their national pledges to the Bonn Challenge.

    Table S2. Mean ROS, total area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of ecoregions within tropical rainforest landscapes.

    Table S3. Mean ROS, study area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of KBAs within tropical rainforest landscapes.

    Table S4. Mean ROS, total area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of tropical rainforest landscapes among hotspots for biodiversity conservation.

  • Supplementary Materials

    This PDF file includes:

    • Fig. S1. Distribution of the total restoration area in relation to the ROS in tropical rainforest landscapes.
    • Fig. S2. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of countries, with data renormalized for each country.
    • Fig. S3. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of biogeographical realms, with data renormalized for each realm (A, Neotropics; B, Afrotropics; C, Indo-Malaysia; D, Australasia).
    • Fig. S4. ROS of tropical rainforest landscapes of global hotspots for biodiversity conservation, with data renormalized for each hotspot.
    • Fig. S5. Identification of restorable areas.
    • Fig. S6. Restoration benefits.
    • Fig. S7. Restoration feasibility factors.
    • Table S1. Country’s ROS, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of tropical rainforest landscapes and their national pledges to the Bonn Challenge.
    • Table S2. Mean ROS, total area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of ecoregions within tropical rainforest landscapes.
    • Table S3. Mean ROS, study area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of KBAs within tropical rainforest landscapes.
    • Table S4. Mean ROS, total area, restorable area, and restorable area with a restoration score of >0.6 of tropical rainforest landscapes among hotspots for biodiversity conservation.

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