Research ArticleGENETICS

Stochastic tunneling across fitness valleys can give rise to a logarithmic long-term fitness trajectory

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Advances  31 Jul 2019:
Vol. 5, no. 7, eaav3842
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav3842

Abstract

Adaptation, where a population evolves increasing fitness in a fixed environment, is typically thought of as a hill-climbing process on a fitness landscape. With a finite genome, such a process eventually leads the population to a fitness peak, at which point fitness can no longer increase through individual beneficial mutations. Instead, the ruggedness of typical landscapes due to epistasis between genes or DNA sites suggests that the accumulation of multiple mutations (via a process known as stochastic tunneling) can allow a population to continue increasing in fitness. However, it is not clear how such a phenomenon would affect long-term fitness evolution. By using a spin-glass type model for the fitness function that takes into account microscopic epistasis, we find that hopping between metastable states can mechanistically and robustly give rise to a slow, logarithmic average fitness trajectory.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.

View Full Text