Research ArticleMATERIALS SCIENCE

Programmable and scalable transfer printing with high reliability and efficiency for flexible inorganic electronics

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Science Advances  17 Jun 2020:
Vol. 6, no. 25, eabb2393
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abb2393
  • Fig. 1 The mechanism of shape-conformal stamp with large adhesion switchability and demonstrations for transfer printing of ultrathin Si nanomembranes.

    (A) Schematic illustration of the novel concept design to construct a shape-conformal stamp with large adhesion switchability. (B) SEM images and (C) corresponding profile of TRT stamp before and after heating on a hotplate. (D) The measured surface roughness of the TRT stamp and (E) energy release rate of the TRT stamp with the glass slide after being uniformly heated on a hotplate at various temperatures. (F) SEM images of the ultrathin, inorganic μ-LED (285 μm by 285 μm by 4.6 μm) on the TRT stamp before and after heating on a hotplate, respectively. (G) Optical image of transfer-printed ultrathin Si pellets (400 μm by 400 μm by 200 nm) on the PDMS substrate under bending deformation. (H) Optical image of large-area Si nanomembrane (2 cm by 2 cm by 3 μm) transfer printed onto the PI substrate. Photo credit: C.W. and C.Lin., Zhejiang University.

  • Fig. 2 Programmable transfer printing of Si nanomembranes and Si nanomembrane–based photodetectors.

    (A) Schematic prototype of the laser-assisted programmable transfer printing system via automated translational stage. (B) Temperature increase at the interface of the TRT stamp and Si ink under various laser powers. (C) Schematic illustration of the programmable transfer printing process: (i) preparing Si pellets on an SOI wafer, (ii) picking up Si pellets using TRT stamp, (iii) programmable heating of Si pellets, and (iv) printing Si pellets on PDMS substrate. (D) Optical images of the programmable transfer printing process. (E) The selectively printed Si pellets on an Ecoflex-coated glass tube. (F) The magnified microscopic images corresponding to (D). Scale bars, 350 μm. (G) Maximum principal strain distribution of Si pellets under the bending radius of 1.5 mm. (H) Selectively printed Si nanomembrane–based photodetectors with a robot-like pattern on PDMS substrate. (I) Dynamic response of photodetector at various given light intensities and (J) measured I-V curve of the photodetector before and after transfer printing on PDMS receiver substrate. Photo credit: C.W. and S.N., Zhejiang University.

  • Fig. 3 Programmable and scalable transfer printing in a highthroughput manner via scanning laser beam functionality.

    Optical images of the flexible strain sensor array (A) on fabricated Si substrate and (B) on B-TRT stamp, respectively. (C) Selectively printed strain sensors on the PDMS substrate. (D) Optical image of strain sensors on the B-TRT stamp with a 10 by 10 array heated by the scanning laser beam. Optical images of strain sensors (E) printed on the PDMS substrate and (F) left on the B-TRT stamp after programmable and scalable transfer printing. (G) Schematic layout of ZnO thin film–based flexible SAW sensor. Optical images of flexible SAW sensor array (H) on fabricated glass substrate with (I) the magnified view of IDTs, and (J) on B-TRT stamp. Optical images of the flexible SAW sensors (K) printed on the PDMS substrate and (L) left on the B-TRT stamp after programmable and scalable transfer printing. The measured resonant frequency of the flexible SAW sensor (M) as a function of temperature increase and (N) before and after transfer printing on the PDMS substrate at 70°C. Photo credit: C.W., Zhejiang University.

  • Fig. 4 Transfer-printed ultrathin μ-LED array for flexible display and healthcare.

    (A) Optical image of transferred μ-LEDs on the TRT stamp from the fabricated 4-inch sapphire wafer by the standard laser liftoff process. (B) Schematic illustration of selectively transfer printing pattern from dense form on the TRT stamp into sparse array for usage. The red squares indicate the μ-LEDs to be transferred from the TRT stamp. (C) Optical image of selectively transfer-printed μ-LEDs in a 10 by 10 array on the PDMS temporary receiver substrate. (D) Optical image of μ-LEDs transfer printed onto the polyimide substrate from the PDMS temporary receiver substrate using the TRT stamp. (E) I-V curve of the μ-LED on the fabricated sapphire wafer and receiving polyimide substrate, respectively. (F and G) Schematic and optical images of the fabricated inorganic μ-LED array–based flexible display. (H) Optical image of μ-LED array–based flexible display wrapped around a glass tube with displayed letters of ZJU. (I) Flexible display attached on the medical tape and mounted onto skin for phototherapy. Photo credit: C.W., Zhejiang University.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary Materials

    Programmable and scalable transfer printing with high reliability and efficiency for flexible inorganic electronics

    Chengjun Wang, Changhong Linghu, Shuang Nie, Chenglong Li, Qianjin Lei, Xiang Tao, Yinjia Zeng, Yipu Du, Shun Zhang, Kaixin Yu, Hao Jin, Weiqiu Chen, Jizhou Song

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    The PDF file includes:

    • Thermal analysis of the TRT stamp under the absorbed laser power of Si ink.
    • Bending deformation analysis of the Si pellets on TRT stamp.
    • Evaluation of the relation between the applied laser power from the laser system and the absorbed laser power of Si pellet.
    • Figs. S1 to S18
    • Legends for movies S1 and S2

    Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

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