Research ArticleHEALTH AND MEDICINE

Multifunctional bioactive Nd-Ca-Si glasses for fluorescence thermometry, photothermal therapy, and burn tissue repair

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Science Advances  07 Aug 2020:
Vol. 6, no. 32, eabb1311
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abb1311
  • Fig. 1 Study design.

    The precursor of Nd-Ca-Si powders was prepared by the coprecipitation process, and the multifunctional Nd-Ca-Si bioglasses with photothermal, fluorescence, and bioactive properties were prepared by the CP technique. The injectable Nd-Ca-Si bioglass/alginate composite hydrogel with same multifunctions was then prepared for in vivo tumor elimination and for determining optimal PTT temperature by fluorescence thermometry and repairing heat-damaged normal tissues by releasing bioactive Ca and Si ions. GDL, d-(+)-gluconic acid δ-lactone.

  • Fig. 2 Photothermal and fluorescence properties of Nd-BG powders.

    (A) Real-time NIR thermal images of powders under 808-nm laser irradiation at the power density of 0.6 W cm−2. (B) Heating curves of powders under 808-nm laser irradiation at the power density of 0.6 W cm−2. (C) Room temperature emission spectra of Nd-BG powders (0.3 W cm−2). a.u., arbitrary units. (D) Linear fitting relationship between 1062-nm fluorescence intensity and temperature for Nd-BG powders.

  • Fig. 3 Photothermal/fluorescence properties of the Nd-BG2 composite hydrogel in vitro.

    (A) Images of the formation of Nd-BG2 composite hydrogels. (B) Heating curves of the Nd-BG2 and CS-BG composite hydrogels (under 808-nm laser irradiation at the power density of 1.5 W cm−2). (C) Linear fitting relationship between 1062-nm fluorescence intensity and temperature for Nd-BG2 composite hydrogels. (D) Room temperature emission spectra of the hydrogel through the mouse tissues with different thickness (1.12 W cm−2). (E) Linear relationship between fluorescence intensity through mouse tissues with different thicknesses and the temperature. (F) Relationship between temperature difference (ΔT) and thickness of mouse skin tissue. (G) Room temperature emission spectra of the hydrogel through different animal tissues with same thickness (1.64 mm; under 808-nm laser irradiation at the power density of 1.12 W cm−2). (H) Linear relationship between fluorescence intensity through different animal tissues with same thickness and temperature. (Photo credit: Lingling Ma, State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, P. R. China; Center of Materials Science and Optoelectronics Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P. R. China.)

  • Fig. 4 Photothermal antitumor effects of the hydrogel with different temperatures in vivo.

    (A) Schematic illustration of photothermal treatment of tumors. (B) Photograph of tumors obtained from eight groups at day 14. In the red dotted box, the tissues were obtained at day 12 according to the animal welfare rules. For the orange dotted box, the Gel 53°C group and the Gel 60°C group showed the scab of the tumor site of mouse. (C) Relative tumor volume in eight groups with increasing days (n = 4). (D) Scar area of mouse skin treated at 60° and 53°C (***P < 0.001). (E) H&E staining images of LM8 tumor tissue under different temperature treatments at day 14 (blue arrow, tumor tissues; red arrow, fibroblasts; yellow arrow, inflammatory cells; green arrow, new blood capillary). (Photo credit: Lingling Ma, State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050, P. R. China; Center of Materials Science and Optoelectronics Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P. R. China.)

  • Fig. 5 Effect of the Nd-BG2 composite hydrogel on burned skin wound healing.

    (A) Wound area with different treatments on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. (B) Quantitation of wound closure rate of different treatment groups (**P < 0.01). (C) H&E staining of burned wound sections on days 7 and 14 after different treatments. NE, newly formed epidermis; ND, newly formed dermis; HF, newly formed hair follicle. (Photo credit: Lingling Ma, State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200050, P. R. China; Center of Materials Science and Optoelectronics Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049, P. R. China.)

  • Fig. 6 Fate of composite hydrogel in mice.

    (A) Ca ion concentrations in liver, heat, spleen, lung, and kidney. (B to D) Ca, Si, and Nd ion concentrations in stool, respectively. *P < 0.05 and **P < 0.01. (E and F) Ca and Si ion concentrations in blood, respectively. *P < 0.05. (G and H) Ca and Si ion concentrations in urine, respectively. ***P < 0.001.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary Materials

    Multifunctional bioactive Nd-Ca-Si glasses for fluorescence thermometry, photothermal therapy, and burn tissue repair

    Lingling Ma, Yanling Zhou, Zhaowenbin Zhang, Yaqin Liu, Dong Zhai, Hui Zhuang, Qin Li, Jianding Yuye, Chengtie Wu, Jiang Chang

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