Research ArticleIMMUNOLOGY

Blood-stage malaria parasites manipulate host innate immune responses through the induction of sFGL2

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Science Advances  26 Feb 2020:
Vol. 6, no. 9, eaay9269
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aay9269

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  • RE: Response to eLetter Author Huang

    Dear editor: Thank you very much for giving us this opportunity to respond to the comments. We are open and positive in the exchange of views and discussion, as they help advance the scientific field and improve our understandings. We have carefully examined the questions raised by a reader and present our itemized responses to these questions and comments.

    I’m very interesting to this article. It’s reported that MCP-1 doesn’t increase under plasmodium infection based most studies. A few studies showed MCP-1 increased up to 2 times. These results are quite different from this paper. In an evolutionary point, the plasmodium would not affect or even inhibit the expression of MCP-1 to facilitate its survival and red cell damage under plasmodium infection would enhance blood coagulation, so FGL2 expression level is higher.

    Response: Thank you for your interest in our work. The expression of MCP-1 after Plasmodium infection has been reported in numerous studies. Plasmodium infection leads to a significant increase in MCP-1 expression in both human (1-3) and rodent malaria (4, 5), but the role of the elevated MCP-1 and the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Thus we set out to investigate this phenomenon and elucidate the mechanisms. In this paper, we provided evidence that sFGL2 was released by the activated Treg (Fig. 6A), but not induced by blood coagulation during parasite infection. Our findings as well as those from other...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.
  • Issues in this article

    I’m very interesting to this article. It’s reported that MCP-1 doesn’t increase under plasmodium infection based most studies. A few studies showed MCP-1 increased up to 2 times. These results are quite different from this paper. In an evolutionary point, the plasmodium would not affect or even inhibit the expression of MCP-1 to facilitate its survival and red cell damage under plasmodium infection would enhance blood coagulation, so the FGL2 expression level is higher.
    1. Issues in WB studies.
    (1) For reliability, avoiding artificial errors and misconduct, the western blotting (WB) results should and could be shown in the same SDS-PAGE gel as possible. It seems that ALL of WB panels in this article are assembled from different WB gels without sufficient evidence to prove all samples in WBs were collected from same experiment and loaded as they mentioned. Although many molecules have similar molecular weight, they could be shown on the same WB membrane by using stripping kits or selecting other internal controls. I don’t know why the authors chose a complicated and unreliable method instead of convenient and reliable one.
    (2) I wonder how authors were able to collect enough samples to run dozens of WB in single study. In general, 100μl sample can be collected from 10cm2 dish and 10-20μl would be loaded in each lane.
    (3) Protein markers are not marked with the molecular weight in ALL WB data in the SM.
    (4) The changes of protein levels in WBs a...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.

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