Research ArticleCORONAVIRUS

Partisan pandemic: How partisanship and public health concerns affect individuals’ social mobility during COVID-19

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science Advances  06 Jan 2021:
Vol. 7, no. 2, eabd7204
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abd7204
  • Fig. 1 Concern with catching COVID-19 and mobility over time by partisanship and COVID-19 impact in the community.

    (A) and (B) graph the weighted (to the adult U.S. population) daily percentage of respondents who are “very” or “somewhat” worried about catching COVID-19 and (C) and (D) graph the average number of social activities individuals report doing in the last 24 hours. (A) and (C) report the daily averages by partisanship and (B) and (D) report the average for each quintile of population adjusted COVID-19 cases in respondents’ counties in the first week of May. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals are reported for each daily average, and plotted lines are loess smoothers to summarize trends over time.

  • Fig. 2 Variation in mobility explained by partisanship and the impact of COVID-19 in the community.

    The daily coefficients of partial determinations are computed via ordinary least squares (OLS) regression using specifications given by Eqs. 1 to 3 run separately on each day. Observations weighted to the U.S. adult population. They describe the percentage of residual variation in specification given by Eqs. 1 that is explained by our two key variables. Standard errors are from 1000 bootstrap samples for each day and represent the 95% distribution of bootstrap estimates. Trend is local regression weighted by the inverse of each estimate’s standard error.

  • Fig. 3 Marginal conditional effect of partisanship and COVID-19 cases on mobility over time.

    Coefficients are from OLS regression using specification given in Eq. 4 run separately on each day. Observations weighted to the U.S. adult population. For party variables, reference is pure independents. Partisan leaners are included with identifying partisans. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals from OLS standard errors clustered by state. Trend is local regression weighted by the inverse of each estimate’s standard error.

  • Fig. 4 Marginal conditional effects of partisanship by state.

    The coefficients and 95% confidence intervals are from estimating using OLS from a pooled model of same-state respondents using specification given in Eq. 4. Because we pool all respondents from a state over time, a polynomial time trend is used to account for time-varying differences. Coefficients are in relation to pure independents. The separate state results are reported according to the state’s aggressiveness of COVID-19 mitigation policies, with higher numbers indicating more aggressive policies to stop the spread. Observations are weighted to the state adult population.

Supplementary Materials

  • Supplementary Materials

    Partisan pandemic: How partisanship and public health concerns affect individuals' social mobility during COVID-19

    J. Clinton, J. Cohen, J. Lapinski and M. Trussler

    Download Supplement

    This PDF file includes:

    • Materials and Methods
    • Figs. S1 to S18
    • Tables S1 to S3

    Files in this Data Supplement:

Stay Connected to Science Advances

Navigate This Article