Science Advances

Supplementary Materials

This PDF file includes:

  • fig. S1. The time scale for the pH-responsive behavior of the PMETAC brushes in QCM-D experiments, where the overtone number (n) is 3.
  • fig. S2. Δf and ΔD as a function of pH of the blank gold-coated resonator, where the overtone number (n) is 3.
  • Shifts in frequency (Δf) and dissipation (ΔD) as a function of pH of the gold-coated resonator grafted with PEMA brushes, where the overtone number (n) is 3.
  • fig. S4. Δf and ΔD as a function of pH of the gold-coated resonator grafted with PMETAC brushes at the overtone number (n) of 3, 5, and 7.
  • fig. S5. WCA on the surface of PMETAC brushes as a function of pH obtained from the pendant bubble contact angle measurements under the relevant pH solutions.
  • fig. S6. Measured oil (hexadecane) contact angle (OCA) on the surface of PMETAC brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S7. A series of photos taken of the PMETAC brushes approaching and retracting from an oil (1,2-dichloroethane) droplet at different pH values during measurements of the adhesive force.
  • fig. S8. Δf and ΔD induced by protein adsorption on the surface of PMETAC brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S9. In situ AFM measurements of the wet thickness of the PMETAC brushes with pH.
  • fig. S10. XPS measurements of the PMETAC brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S11. Change in fitting strength of the 3200 cm−1 peak of the PMETAC brushes as a function of pH in the ssp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S12. The ppp SFG spectra of PMETAC brushes in the frequency range of 3000 to 3800 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • ig. S13. The ppp SFG spectra of PMETAC brushes in the frequency range of 1100 to 1400 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S14. Change in frequency of the C–O stretching peak of the PMETAC brushes as a function of pH in the ssp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S15. Change in fitting strength of the 1220 cm−1 peak of the PMETAC brushes as a function of pH in the ssp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S16. The ssp SFG spectra of the PMETAC brushes in the frequency range of 2750 to 3100 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S17. The ppp SFG spectra of the PMETAC brushes in the frequency range of 1600 to 1800 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S18. The ssp SFG spectra of the PMETAC brushes in the frequency range of 1600 to 1800 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S19. Change in frequency of the C–O stretching peak of the PSPMA brushes as a function of pH in the ppp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S20. The ssp SFG spectra of the PSPMA brushes in the frequency range of 1100 to 1400 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S21. Change in fitting strength of the 1220 cm−1 peak of the PSPMA brushes as a function of pH in the ppp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S22. The ppp SFG spectra of the PSPMA brushes in the frequency range of 1400 to 1800 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S23. Change in fitting strength of the 3200 cm−1 peak of the PSPMA brushes as a function of pH in the ssp SFG spectra.
  • fig. S24. The ppp SFG spectra of PSPMA brushes in the frequency range of 3000 to 3800 cm−1 as a function of pH.
  • fig. S25. XPS measurements of the PSPMA brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S26. Δf and ΔD as a function of pH of the gold-coated resonator grafted with PSPMA brushes at the overtone number (n) of 3, 5, and 7.
  • fig. S27. In situ AFM measurements of the wet thickness of the PSPMA brushes with pH.
  • fig. S28. Water contact angle (WCA) on the surface of PSPMA brushes as a function of pH obtained from the contact angle measurements in air.
  • fig. S29. WCA on the surface of PSPMA brushes as a function of pH obtained from the pendant bubble contact angle measurements under the relevant pH solutions.
  • fig. S30. OCA on the surface of PSPMA brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S31. Lubrication tests on the surface of PSPMA brushes at different pH values.
  • fig. S32. Surface ε potential and surface charge density (s) as a function of pH for the blank substrate and the quartz substrates grafted with PMETAC, PSPMA, PDMAEMA, and PMA brushes.
  • fig. S33. Δf and ΔD of the gold-coated resonator grafted with PMA brushes as a function of pH, where the overtone number (n) is 3.
  • fig. S34. Wet thickness of the PMA brushes as a function of pH obtained from ellipsometric measurements.
  • fig. S35. Δf and ΔD of the gold-coated resonator grafted with PDMAEMA brushes as a function of pH, where the overtone number (n) is 3.
  • fig. S36. Wet thickness of the PDMAEMA brushes as a function of pH obtained from ellipsometric measurements.
  • fig. S37. Response of the PMETAC brushes as a function of the concentration of OH or Br.
  • fig. S38. Response of the PMETAC and PVBTMA brushes as a function of pH.
  • fig. S39. Molar conductivity (Λm) of free strong polyelectrolytes as a function of pH at different polymer concentrations.
  • fig. S40. XPS spectra of the PMETAC and PSPMA brushes as a function of pH.
  • Legends for movies S1 and S2
  • References (4150)

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Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

  • movie S1 (.mov format). Lubrication tests on the surface of PMETAC brushes at different pH values.
  • movie S2 (.mov format). Lubrication tests on the surface of PSPMA brushes at different pH values.

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