Science Advances

Supplementary Materials

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  • Fig. S1. Scaffold implantation on ischemic ligation.
  • Fig. S2. Representative FACS gating strategy for quantifying percentage and number of different immune cells.
  • Fig. S3. Distribution of CD4+ T cells recruited to scaffold and upper leg muscles.
  • Fig. S4. Recruitment of CD4+ T cells in OT-II mice.
  • Fig. S5. OVA/ALUM vaccination enhances IL-5–producing OVA-specific CD4+ T cells in BALB/c mice.
  • Fig. S6. Concentration of TH2 CD4+ T cells in ischemic hindlimb muscle.
  • Fig. S7. Images of wells from IL-5 ELISPOT assay, measuring IL-5–secreting cells from cells isolated from ischemic thighs 4 days after ischemic ligation.
  • Fig. S8. Images of wells from IL-5 ELISPOT assay, measuring IL-5–secreting cells from cells isolated from ischemic thighs 7 days after ischemic ligation.
  • Fig S9. Concentration of TH1/TH2 cytokines secreted by OVA-stimulated cells in ischemic hindlimb muscle.
  • Fig. S10. Distribution of eosinophils recruited to scaffold and upper leg muscles.
  • Fig. S11. Presence of α-SMA+ blood vessels in tissue adjacent to scaffold.
  • Fig. S12. Antigen-releasing scaffolds enhance blood perfusion recovery following ischemic injury in an antigen-specific manner.
  • Fig. S13. Blood perfusion recovery in vaccinated mice with OVA-releasing scaffolds depends on the presence of CD4+ T cells.
  • Fig. S14. Characterization of types of muscle fibers in histological sections of ischemic lower leg muscles.

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