Science Advances

Supplementary Materials

This PDF file includes:

  • Section S1. Crystal growth and characterization
  • Section S2. Exfoliation of FGT thin flakes and fabrication of FGT/Pt bilayer devices
  • Section S3. Correction of current-induced effective fields
  • Section S4. Current-driven switching at different temperatures
  • Section S5. Current-driven magnetization switching
  • Section S6. Current-driven magnetization switching and measurement of effective fields corresponding the current-induced torques
  • Section S7. Temperature dependence of PMA
  • Fig. S1. Single crystals of FGT at the colder side in a sealed quartz tube (diameter of the tube is 1.5 cm).
  • Fig. S2. Characterization of FGT single crystal grown by CVT method.
  • Fig. S3. Zero-field–cooling and field-cooling curves of the FGT crystals (grown by CVT) measured from 10 to 300 K with the external magnetic field (H = 0.1 T) parallel to the c axis.
  • Fig. S4. Hysteresis loops measured of the FGT crystals (grown by CVT) at various temperatures with the external magnetic field parallel to the c axis.
  • Fig. S5. Zero-field–cooling and field-cooling curves of the FGT crystals (grown by CVT method) measured from 10 to 300 K with the external magnetic field (H = 0.1 T) parallel to the ab plane.
  • Fig. S6. Hysteresis loops of the FGT crystals (grown by CVT method) measured at various temperatures with the external magnetic field parallel to the ab plane.
  • Fig. S7. Zero-field–cooling and field-cooling curves of the FGT crystals (grown by CVT) measured from 10 to 300 K with the external magnetic field (H = 0.1 T) parallel to the c axis and the ab plane.
  • Fig. S8. Characterization of FGT single crystal grown by flux method.
  • Fig. S9. Zero-field–cooling and field-cooling curves of the FGT crystals (grown by flux method) measured from 10 to 300 K with the external magnetic field (H = 0.1 T) parallel to the c axis.
  • Fig. S10. Hysteresis loops measured of the FGT crystals (grown by flux method) at various temperatures with the external magnetic field parallel to the c axis.
  • Fig. S11. Schematic view of FGT exfoliation, transfer, and device fabrication process.
  • Fig. S12. Atomic force microscopy image of the obtained FGT flakes on SiO2 substrate through two strategies.
  • Fig. S13. Optical image of the device fabrication process.
  • Fig. S14. Estimation of the temperature dependence of the resistance of FGT layers.
  • Fig. S15. Schematic diagram of measurement setup and coordinate system.
  • Fig. S16. Current-driven switching at 10 K.
  • Fig. S17. Current-driven switching at 20 K.
  • Fig. S18. Current-driven switching at 30 K.
  • Fig. S19. Current-driven switching at 40 K.
  • Fig. S20. Current-driven switching at 50 K.
  • Fig. S21. Current-driven switching at 60 K.
  • Fig. S22. Current-driven switching at 70 K.
  • Fig. S23. Current-driven switching at 80 K.
  • Fig. S24. Current-driven switching at 90 K.
  • Fig. S25. Current-driven switching at 100 K.
  • Fig. S26. Current-driven switching at 110 K.
  • Fig. S27. Current-driven switching at 120 K.
  • Fig. S28. Current-driven switching at 130 K.
  • Fig. S29. Rxy as a function of current under different in-plane magnetic field at 140 K.
  • Fig. S30. Current-driven magnetization switching for different initial states.
  • Fig. S31. Current-driven switching in an FGT/Ta bilayer.
  • Fig. S32. Characterization of the current-induced effective fields in an FGT/Ta device.
  • Fig. S33. Hall resistance as a function of in-plane magnetic field.
  • Fig. S34. Temperature dependence of effective anisotropy field (μ0Hk), coercivity (μ0Hc), and saturation anomalous Hall resistance.
  • References (3335)

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