Science Advances

Supplementary Materials

The PDF file includes:

  • Section S1. Definition of AIx and PWV
  • Fig. S1. A geometrical model for loop structure.
  • Fig. S2. Structure of the conductive yarn.
  • Fig. S3. Structure of the nylon thread.
  • Fig. S4. Compatibility of the TATSAs.
  • Fig. S5. Photograph of TATSAs in different colors.
  • Fig. S6. Photographs demonstrating that the TATSA has remarkable endurance.
  • Fig. S7. Computerized flat knitting machine carrying out automatic knitting of a cloth.
  • Fig. S8. Details of the TATSA.
  • Fig. S9. Simulation result of the force distribution of a TATSA under applied pressures at 0.2 kPa using the COMSOL software.
  • Fig. S10. Simulation results of the force distribution of a contact unit under the applied pressures at 0.2 and 2 kPa, respectively.
  • Fig. S11. Complete schematic illustrations of the charge transfer of a contact unit under short-circuit conditions.
  • Fig. S12. Schematic illustration of the experimental setup.
  • Fig. S13. Continuous output voltage and current of TATSA in response to the continuously applied external pressure in a measurement cycle.
  • Fig. S14. Voltage response to various numbers of loop units in the same fabric area when keeping the loop number in the wale direction unchanged.
  • Fig. S15. A comparison between the output performances of the two textile sensors using the full cardigan stitch and plain stitch.
  • Fig. S16. Plots showing frequency responses at the dynamic pressure of 1 kPa and pressure input frequency of 3, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 18, and 20 Hz.
  • Fig. S17. The durability test of a TATSA under a pressure of 1 kPa.
  • Fig. S18. The output voltages of the TATSA at different tension in the wale and course direction.
  • Fig. S19. The output voltages after different twisting times.
  • Fig. S20. The output voltages of the sensor at various relative humidity from 10 to 90%.
  • Fig. S21. The pulse waveforms at ankle of different individuals.
  • Fig. S22. The pulse waveforms of different age groups.
  • Fig. S23. Different tightness was achieved by tightening the wristbands at both ends of the sensor.
  • Fig. S24. The pulse waveforms on different measuring positions.
  • Fig. S25. The output voltages of the sensor when the subject was in the static and motion conditions.
  • Fig. S26. Photograph showing the TATSAs placed on the abdomen and wrist simultaneously for measuring respiration and pulse, respectively.
  • Table S1. Performances and applications of smart textiles for wearable devices.
  • Table S2. Data of AIx and PWV of the healthy, HTN, CHD, and DM groups.
  • Table S3. Rating criteria for OSAS.

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Other Supplementary Material for this manuscript includes the following:

  • Movie S1 (.mp4 format). Fabrication of the TATSA.
  • Movie S2 (.mp4 format). Fabrication of the clothes.
  • Movie S3 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse signal at the neck.
  • Movie S4 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse signal at the wrist.
  • Movie S5 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse signal at the fingertip.
  • Movie S6 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse signal at the ankle.
  • Movie S7 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse and respiratory signals at the chest.
  • Movie S8 (.mp4 format). Comparison of the pulse waveforms measured by the medical instrument and the TATSA.
  • Movie S9 (.mp4 format). Comparison of the respiratory waveforms measured by the medical instrument and the TATSA.
  • Movie S10 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse and respiratory signals while sleeping.
  • Movie S11 (.mp4 format). Monitoring of the pulse and respiratory signals while sitting.

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